Are you a nurse with a long-term disability?

If you suffer from the effects and symptoms of a disabling condition, you may feel overwhelmed, in constant pain and beleaguered by numerous questions like “Can I keep working?” “What do I do when I have to stop working?” “When should I file for disability?” “How do I file for disability?” “What happens if my claim is denied?”

How we help.

When a nurse or other medical professional contacts our firm, the first thing we do is talk to the nurse to understand how the disability has affected them, the nature of their work, and to discuss the language of their policy. This gives us the information and tools to answer their questions based upon our extensive experience in helping medical professionals through this difficult process. Depending upon the situation that the nurse finds his or herself in, the firm can provide a wide variety of assistance.

The claims filing process.

If the nurse has only recently become disabled or is suffering with a condition that will deteriorate and soon disable them, we can guide the medical professional through the claims filing process. We have seen, time and again, medical professionals who believe that if they answer the questions on the claims forms as best they can and submit all the supplemental material that the carrier is requesting that their claim will be approved.

Unfortunately, this is how many claimants get themselves denied; either because they misunderstand questions, answer questions incompletely, or make statements to the insurance carrier that are taken out of context in order to justify denial of the claim. By working with our firm at this early stage, we are able to help ensure that the claimant does not make the common mistakes that will lead to their claim being denied.

What if your claim has already been denied?

When nurses come to us after their claim has already been denied, terminated, or approved on a lesser basis (such as residual or partial) we can begin the process to get their rightful benefits.

The advantage our firm has is that we understand the medical aspects and limitations of many types of disability and because we specialize in representing medical professionals, we also understand the occupational duties and responsibilities of nurses across all types of specialties and practice areas. This is critical in building a winning argument for disability because the primary question is always whether or not the condition prevents the medical professional from doing their job.

Negotiating a settlement or buy-out.

Even if the medical professional is already receiving monthly benefits, we are able to use our contacts in high-level positions within the insurance companies in order to negotiate a settlement or buyout of the policy. The advantages of a buyout over receiving monthly checks are substantial: the medical professional never has to fill out another insurance form, worry about benefits being terminated, be subjected to surveillance, or be concerned that if they die their estate would not receive another penny from their carrier.

In addition, the medical professional has the ability to invest the policy benefits in the manner of their choosing rather than relying upon an allowance from the insurance carrier while the company’s pockets get fat with the interest earned on your money.